scalestails:

On the left, the lies on the box. On the right, the product itself.

If you’re ever wondering why people think it’s ok to keep bettas and goldfish in bowls, this is a major cause. Companies want to sell overpriced decorative bowls that they churn out en masse, Pet stores gain from this as well. A person spends $40 on a betta “bowl”, gravel, a plant, food, and the fish. The betta dies a slow painful death, they buy a replacement and are told by employees and companies world wide that it was how the betta wanted to live, and they only live up to a year. This repeats over and over and over again. The store makes more money on replacement fish than if they bought a proper set up that would last them 4 years or more.

It has entered our general consciousness that goldfish bowls are right and bettas like small spaces. All of those horrific myths floating around are perpetuated not only by pet stores who know nothing, but by large name brand companies. That is why it’s so hard to convince people it’s wrong. They are told over and over again throughout their lives that it is right.

Elmos goldfish Dorothy on Sesame Street.

Commercials for Petco featuring several goldfish in bowls.

Friends and family who have been told misinformation by pet stores.

The packages themselves, lying to people.

The idea that a goldfish is a good way to teach responsibility.

In fact, almost everyone has had a goldfish as a child. These fish always die when they are little more than babies. A fraction of their adult size, a fraction of their natural lifespan. And yet they are told that is how it goes. Goldfish don’t live very long, goldfish don’t get big, goldfish don’t need a filter. Bettas like small spaces, bettas don’t need a heater, bettas like dirty water. This information is spread over and over and over again when you are a child, then you go out and tell your children and they tell their children.

It’s really difficult to deal with a situation like this. Trying to change an idea so deeply rooted in our society is extraordinarily hard, especially if people realize they are so horribly wrong that means they’ve participated in animal abuse. And that makes them a bad person. This thought makes them defensive, sometimes violently so. People often have extreme reactions when proven wrong.

So please, be persistent, be patient, and above all be calm. I know it is hard, I know it all too well, but the message HAS to get out there. If we work together we can slowly bring this abuse to a stop. Never be afraid to speak out against animal abuse, no matter what the form.


To understand why all of these packages are wrong please read these articles and their sources. The mud puddle myth and goldfish bowl concept must be stopped. 

http://scalestails.tumblr.com/post/53150684212/betta-myths-debunked

http://scalestails.tumblr.com/post/17976595744/goldfish-myths-introduction-goldfish-carasius

Hi, I came to you guys a while ago with a filter turning green. It’s happening again, and I don’t really know what to make of it. My betta Vriska is still healthy and frisky, and he still flares at my finger; the water is crystal clear besides a thin layer of particles on the surface. The green stuff is on my silk plant that I recycled from a previous aquarium, and I think it might be algae but it seems too bright green for that. I scraped some off with my fingernail and it doesn’t really seem slimy. What do you think?
http://i.imgur.com/AmU88pm.jpg

» it looks sort of like cyanobacteria to me (blue green algae) but it’s hard to tell since the photos are a little blurry. is it possible to get some clearer shots, or do you mind looking up cyanobacteria on google to see if that’s what you have?

Hi, I came to you guys a while ago with a filter turning green. It’s happening again, and I don’t really know what to make of it. My betta Vriska is still healthy and frisky, and he still flares at my finger; the water is crystal clear besides a thin layer of particles on the surface. The green stuff is on my silk plant that I recycled from a previous aquarium, and I think it might be algae but it seems too bright green for that. I scraped some off with my fingernail and it doesn’t really seem slimy. What do you think?

http://i.imgur.com/AmU88pm.jpg

» it looks sort of like cyanobacteria to me (blue green algae) but it’s hard to tell since the photos are a little blurry. is it possible to get some clearer shots, or do you mind looking up cyanobacteria on google to see if that’s what you have?

Anonymous asked: How many mini pellets per day?, Hikari Betta Bio Gold. Packaging has reverse directions incorrect.

5 or so is usually good. (:

This is my new betta, waiting to be put in his tank. He’s a delta tail :)

This is my new betta, waiting to be put in his tank. He’s a delta tail :)

Anonymous asked: How often should i change my bettas tank? as in the inside, different plants, hidey places, shape/ size of the bowl etc

Totally up to you. I wouldn’t do it too often (at least the size and shape part since moving your fish around a lot can stress him out quickly), but when you do your water changes feel free to shift things around a little.

On that note, if s/he is in a bowl, maybe consider upgrading to a small filtered and heated tank! :) They’ll appreciate the warmth and the extra space quite a bit.

izzy-the-fish-girl:

Blue Marble HMPK ~by Gao Hui on Flickr

izzy-the-fish-girl:

Blue Marble HMPK ~by Gao Hui on Flickr

(via copperbettas)

Anonymous asked: How old can Bettas get?

It varies depending on how they are kept and maintained. In a bowl setup with no heat or filtration the average life is usually around 2-3 years… however, properly kept with warm and clean water they can live upwards of six or seven.